Interview: Rarely Asked Questions – Stuart Goldsmith

Stuart Goldsmith is arguably better known for interviewing stand-ups than being a stand-up. His Comedian’s Comedian podcast has become essential listening for anyone remotely interested in how a comedian’s mind works. His latest episode, with Jeremy Hardy, is well worth a listen as Hardy talks about his early days on the circuit and confesses to fiddling his benefits. Goldsmith is certainly full of ideas. As well as premiering a new show in Edinburgh in August he is also planning to crowdsource material for a special show - putting together a gig made up of public gags - find out more about that here. In the meantime though you can enjoy his current show, Compared To What, in which he reflects on recent major changes in his life and much more. If this triumphant set is a guide I’ve got a feeling that soon Goldsmith is definitely going to be better known for his stand-up than his stand-up podcasts.
 
Stuart Goldsmith is at the Soho Theatre from May 30 - June 3. Tickets here. All tour dates here.
 
 
 
1. What is the last thing you do before you go onstage (apart from check your flies and/or check your knickers aren't sticking out of your skirt and check for spinach between your teeth )?
 
I take a deep breath and remind myself that it's not fear, it's excitement.
 
2. What irritates you?
 
Being accused of something I haven't done. Like comedy.  Boom!
 
3. What is the most dangerous thing you have ever done?
 
Fire-breathing in a pub car-park. After a while the ability to perform certain dangerous-but-managed circus stunts evolves into blissful over-confidence.  Also with the advent the internet it became clear the fuel I was using was probably carcinogenic, so that was nice.
 
4. What is the most stupid thing you have ever done?
 
Chose which university to go to based on a relationship.  Got dumped three months in.
 
5. What has surprised you the most during your career in comedy?
 
That there is no "comedy industry". That all of the competitions, awards, blogs, reviewers, promoters, producers and TV shows are all just people trying to make their own thing work, just like comedians themselves. Nothing is "official".  That realisation was genuinely mind-blowing.
 
Interview continues here.
 

 

Zircon - This is a contributing Drupal Theme
Design by WeebPal.